Receive an OSHA citation?

Find out what what to do next.

Need legal representation?

Our attorneys specialize in OSHA defense.

Trying to avoid citations?

Learn the most common OSHA citations.

What Our Clients Are Saying

Contractor

Orlando, Florida

I can’t tell you guys how much I appreciate all of your efforts and how important your firm is to the success and future of our company.

General Contractor

Merritt Island, Florida

Your team is amazing man. I appreciate you guys more than you can imagine.

Roofing Contractor

Lakeland, Florida

I want to personally thank you for everything that you did to assist me during the recent OSHA investigation. With your help, the whole process has been easier to accomplish!

Contractor

San Antonio, Texas

Thanks for the great advice and for getting our citation resolved.

Contractor

West Park, Florida

I just can’t thank you enough for the work you did and the negotiation you undertook on my behalf. I will highly recommend your company to everyone I can in the construction field. Thanks again.

Roofing Contractor

Fort Myers, Florida

I was in a bad spot when I reached out to you, and I am very thankful for your direction during the aftermath.

Roofing Contractor

Lakeland, Florida

Thank you for the great advice and for getting our citation resolved.

Recent Announcements

Material Handling Injuries in Construction Part 2

In this two-part series, an OSHA defense attorney is discussing one of the most common and underrated causes of an injury in the construction workplace—when workers improperly handle and move large materials. In the first section, we explained what types of injuries result from these labor-intensive tasks. In this section, we will discuss some safety tips to help prevent overexertion injuries from transpiring in your workplace.

Advice for Lifting Objects

When lifting and carrying heavy materials, the likelihood of an injury greatly increases as stress is put on a worker’s body. In order to avoid this from happening, workers should practice the following safety tips:

  • Always hold materials close to your body when carrying them.
  • Avoid bending over to lift objects whenever you can.
  • When bending is required, do not make quick jerking motions or twist your back.
  • Always lift objects with your legs.
  • Never lift more than 50 pounds on your own.
  • Never hold materials directly overhead.
  • Take plenty of breaks to avoid strains and serious injuries.

Other Advice for Handling Materials

Here are a few more tips for contractors to ensure that workers are not injured handling and moving heavy materials:

Coordinating efforts: Contractors need to coordinate exactly where materials should be dropped off. Materials should always be located in close proximity to the area where they will be used. These materials should also be elevated at a height that prevents the worker from needing to constantly bend over to lift the materials. You never want to make material handling tasks more challenging than they need to be.         

Equipment and tools: It’s important to reduce the chances of injury by investing in the right tools and equipment to assist your workers with their tasks. Here are some ways to help prevent injury:

  • Use a dolly: There are many types of dollies that can assist workers with conveniently moving materials from one area of a site to another.
  • Wear personal protective equipment (PPE): Workers should be provided hardhats, eyewear, and gloves to protect themselves. Further, straps and handles or panel carriers can assist with their moving efforts.
  • Have the right equipment: Forklifts, cranes, and skid steer loaders, should always be utilized on projects that require significant lifting and transporting of objects.   

Understand risks: Contractors need to be mindful of tasks that require a higher degree of risk for their workers. They should also make certain that their workforce is in compliance with safety measures when performing these tasks. Remember, with the right safety measures in place, the chances of a serious injury transpiring at your workplace dramatically decreases.

If you would like to speak with an OSHA defense lawyer, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

Material Handling Injuries in Construction Part 1

Construction is hard work that requires contractors and project managers to always consider the most effective way to complete projects while also being mindful of safety procedures. On a jobsite, there are often clear hazards right in front of your eyes, but there can also be hidden dangers you don’t recognize on the surface level. Either way, these things can impact the health and wellness of you and your workers.

In this two-part article, an OSHA lawyer will discuss one of the most underrated causes of injury in the construction workplace: when workers improperly lift and handle heavy materials. Remember, for any of your construction project legal needs, contact our experienced and knowledgeable OSHA lawyers.

Manual Material Handling Injuries

One of the most common causes of injury happens when workers handle materials. This is especially common in construction, manufacturing, and retail positions that require a lot of heavy lifting and transporting of items. When lifting, pushing, moving, or carrying materials,  the most common type of affliction workers experience is a soft tissue injury. Muscle, ligament, and tendon injuries can occur quickly and with little warning. These injuries can also develop into debilitating, long-term injuries like a herniated disc or strained back, which may take the worker an extensive period of time to recover from.

Handling Tasks Can Lead to Accidents

Whether it’s a strain, sprain, tear, cut, puncture, contusion, fracture, inflammation, or nerve pain, improperly lifting heavy materials can immediately impact the health of a construction worker. Further, material handling jobs that require lifting and transporting massive or bulky items can also lead to other serious problems on the worksite.

For example, OSHA’s “Fatal Four” leading causes of fatalities in the construction industry can be closely related to tasks that require the handling of large materials. This includes workers that fall off ladders when they are transporting items or are struck-by or caught in-between hazards when moving bulky objects.

In the second section of this series, our OSHA lawyers will explain how to avoid these types of accidents from transpiring at your jobsite.   

If you would like to speak with an OSHA lawyer, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

Beryllium Standards and OSHA

After 45 years, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA’s) new standards for beryllium exposure went into effect for the construction industry on May 11, 2018. OSHA reduced the amount of allowable airborne particles of beryllium workers are exposed to.

Read the information below written by an OSHA attorney to get a better understanding of beryllium.

What is Beryllium?

Beryllium is a lightweight, gray metal element that is extremely good at conducting heat and electricity. It is often alloyed with copper due to its corrosion resistance and hardness. Beryllium oxide is mixed in ceramics and used in wiring materials. It is also found in metal slag used in construction for abrasive blasting. Blasting can cause an excess of airborne particles.

Beryllium has been classified as a human carcinogen by The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

New Standards

The new standards reduce the permissible exposure limit, or PEL, for beryllium, averaged over eight hours, to 0.2 micrograms per cubic meter of air. The previous PEL was ten times higher.

Respirators are utilized to help improve worker safety but cannot be relied upon in all cases. Proper ventilation is crucial to worker safety and OSHA compliance. There are more resources for new standards on the OSHA website.

Workers’ Health Risks

Too much exposure to beryllium can have adverse effects on the health of your workers. Usually, exposure to beryllium comes from directly touching alloys or inhaling airborne particles. Inhaling airborne particles of beryllium can lead to pneumonia and other pulmonary diseases.

Some workers can become sensitized to the element after skin contact or inhalation. That means when they come in contact with the particles, their immune system reacts. With too much exposure a worker can contract chronic beryllium disease (CBD), causing fatigue, shortness of breath and night sweats. Beryllium exposure can also lead to lung cancer, but CBD is more common.

If your workers are exposed to beryllium by abrasive blasting or component handling, make sure you are compliant with the new standards.

If you would like to speak with an OSHA attorney, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

Contact

To request a consultation, please call 1-866-303-5868 or fill out the form below.

**Please be aware that the submission of the contact form does not constitute legal or form an attorney-client relationship. Cotney Construction Law does not agree to represent you or take your case simply because you complete this form or email the firm. Furthermore, Cotney Construction Law does not wish to represent anyone in a jurisdiction where this website fails to comply with all applicable laws and ethical rules. Do not use the form to submit confidential, privileged, or sensitive information. The information submitted on this form is not privileged. As with any information submitted over the internet, there is a risk that the information could be intercepted, viewed, or retrieved by a third party.

Sitemap |  Disclaimer |  Privacy